Adopt-A-Dog-Month

This piece was written for an Intro to Media Writing course. The assignment was to draft a hypothetical news release memo.

Laila, 15 months old, plays with new family member Titan at the Camp Pendleton Animal Shelter during the annual adoption event July 26. Teresa Setter, the shelter supervisor, said she hopes to see at least 22 dogs and cats find good homes because of this event.  In addition to pet adoptions, there were also veterinarians on sight to perform free microchiping and exams for the adopted animals, gift bags with pet items in them, a military working dog demonstration and pony rides. For more information on the animals in the shelter please visit building 25132 or call 760-725-8120.
Laila, 15 months old, plays with new family member Titan at the Camp Pendleton Animal Shelter during the annual adoption event July 26. Teresa Setter, the shelter supervisor, said she hopes to see at least 22 dogs and cats find good homes because of this event. In addition to pet adoptions, there were also veterinarians on sight to perform free microchiping and exams for the adopted animals, gift bags with pet items in them, a military working dog demonstration and pony rides. For more information on the animals in the shelter please visit building 25132 or call 760-725-8120.

Newport, R.I.

October celebrates Adopt-A-Dog Month by encouraging animal lovers to consider adopting a dog from the local shelter or rescue group.

This year, the American Humane Associate wants to focus especially on helping older dogs. There is a strong need to provide safe, loving homes for the thousands of older pets that often face the highest risk in animal shelters. Dogs over the age of 6 tend to be less rambunctious than younger dogs, are often house-trained, can be a great fit for people with busy lifestyles, are so grateful for a second chance, ad they love you unconditionally.

Each year, an estimated 3 million to 4 million shelter animals are euthanized; local shelters are the perfect place to find all kinds of dogs, all waiting for a loving home.

Dr. Robin Ganzert, president and CEO of American Humane Association says: “It’s heartbreaking to think about all the senior animals who had been cherished pets before they suddenly found themselves confused and alone in shelter kennels. Far too often this happens to many older dogs through no fault of their own—after their human owners encounter financial troubles, illness, or other life upheavals.”

TODAY.com writer, and published author of, “My Old Dog: Rescued Pets with Remarkable Second Acts,” Laura T. Coffey says: “senior dogs who get adopted from shelters just might be the most grateful dogs on the planet. And don’t let their age fool you! It’s amazing to see how much these dogs still have to offer and teach us.”

American Humane Association is the country’s first national humane organization. Since 1877, American Humane Association has been at the forefront of virtually every major advance in protecting our most vulnerable from cruelty, abuse, and neglect. Find out more about shelters and rescue groups and get free resources to help promote Adopt-A-Dog Month. http://www.americanhumane.org/animals/programs/special- initiatives/adopt-a-dog-month/shelters-rescue-groups.html

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s